Don’t upgrade to iOS 10!

iOS 10 is out and has been making a splash with new home screen unlock method, new to view your messages, and people unable to find the “shuffle” button in the music app. Granted iOS 10 has a lot of shiny new features and polished up old features. More people upgraded to iOS 10 faster than iOS 9

A major software upgrade like iOS 10 and the upcoming macOS Sierra has a lot of bug issues currently unknown to Apple and other developers. Regardless of how many betas it went through there will be bugs that will pop up once released to the public and installed by early adopters. For example shortly after iOS 10 was released many early adopters were unable to their phones at all  which caused Apple to immediately release a quick patch barely hours after it released the upgrade.

During the beta testing phase the pool of devices the software is tested on is limited and doesn’t accurately reflect the devices used by millions and millions of iPhone users across the globe. While two people may have the same model of iPhone, how they use it, the apps, and the content they have on it vary extremely. One person may just use their iPhone for YouTube, Twitter, email, and driving directions while the other user has almost a hundred apps from social media, games, productivity, and more; all of which affect the iPhone in different ways.

Instead wait until the beginning of October after Apple releases one or two minor patch updates such as 10.0.2 or 10.0.3. Waiting until October before updating lets the early adopters discover the bugs (the hard way) for Apple to patch. An added benefit to waiting is that almost all the apps you use should be updated by their developers and fully compatible with iOS 10 by then.

Is your iPhone/iPad/iPod backed up? Abridged

You have important stuff on your Apple iDevice right? If you’re like me, I have voice memos, app settings and data, contacts, calendars, reminders, Pages Documents, Number’s Spreadsheets, and photos. Are they being backed up, well of course they are, they’re being synced to iCloud, right?

 

Wrong!

 

The beautify of Apple iCloud syncing service is that any changes you make on one device will automatically be copied to all your other iCloud enabled devices as soon as they connect to the internet, if they aren’t already. So when you update the info for Uncle Virgil, add a new telephone number for Aunt Jean, that new girl’s contact info, those changes will be “pushed” or synced to your Mac or other iDevice.

The horror of iCloud syncing service is that any changes you make on one device will automatically be copied to all your other iCloud enabled devices as soon as they connect to the internet, if they aren’t already. So when you accidentally delete that new girls contact info along with everything else in your address book, before you can even scream let alone cry, those changes will pushed to your other Apple Devices.

Your best bet to protect content on your devices is to back up your devices to both a computer and a backup drive. At least once a week back your iDevices up to your computer by plugging them into your computer, then open iTunes, and click your device icon as if you were going to sync it, then scroll down the window and click backup. If you get a message window asking to backup apps, click yes. After your finish connect your Mac to either a backup drive or Apple Time Capsule, enable Time Machine (if it isn’t already), then select “Backup Now” from the Time Machine Menu icon.

Windows users, since you don’t have Apple Time Machine built in to your computer, Google “backup windows computer” or just click this link.